Things to do in Kempsey – NSW – Australia


In the Mid North Coast region of New South Wales, you’ll find the town of Kempsey, the seat of the Kempsey Shire. The town is situated 16.5 km inland from the Pacific Ocean along the Macleay Valley Way. The town is crossed by the Pacific Highway and North Coast railway line. If you’re visiting Kempsey, you can also check out the Slim Dusty Centre and Crescent Head Lookout, as well as the Dunghutti-Ngaku Aboriginal Art Gallery.

The Slim Dusty Centre

The Slim Dusty Centre in Kempsey, NSW, is a museum dedicated to the Australian singer and songwriter. The centre features an exhibition of materials from the Kirkpatrick family archive and contributions from fans. The museum is an insight into the life and career of Slim, who recorded more than 100 albums and won 70 gold and platinum awards. He sold more than seven million records and toured the country almost continually.

The Slim Dusty Centre in Kempseh, NSW, is a multi-use cultural centre. The museum exhibition features memorabilia from Slim Dusty, an Australian country music legend and country music icon. Visitors can view Slim Dusty’s guitars, as well as other interesting musical ephemera. The centre is open from 10am to 4pm.

Crescent Head Lookout

The Crescent Head Lookout is a steep climb that offers sweeping views of the ocean, farmlands, and mountains. This historic lookout offers breathtaking vistas that will make you wish you could stay longer. The lookout is only accessible from May to November. If you’re feeling adventurous, try a hike to the lookout from the town of Kempsey. If you enjoy a challenge, you can also try a golf course at Crescent Head, which boasts six holes and a view of the ocean.

Visitors to Crescent Head should spend at least one day here. This coastal town offers a number of great things to do for everyone. There are numerous attractions for tourists of all ages and interests. The world-famous right-hand point break wraps around Little Nobby headland and into the bay. The area is also classed as Australia’s famous Natural Surfing Reserve. You can also see the Koala Hospital and play a round of golf at the scenic Crescent Head Country Club.

Kempsey Riverside Park

If you’re searching for a scenic picnic spot, look no further than Kempsey Riverside Park. This shady park offers picnic tables, barbecues, and a public wharf with an excellent view of the Macleay River. The park also features a playground with new equipment and a market with more than 100 stallholders. For a bit of culture, check out the Slim Dusty Centre, which holds a four-day Australian music festival every month. The grounds of the park also feature a flying fox, climbing frame, and water features.

Near the CBD, Rudder Park is a great place for picnics. Located on the east bank of the Macleay River, this park has a lookout that faces west. You’ll love watching the sun set from this park. The park is 2.75 hectares in size, and has several Aboriginal plant species. You can even take a swim if you’re in the mood for a dip.

Dunghutti-Ngaku Aboriginal Art Gallery

The Dunghutti-Ngaku Aboriginal Arts Gallery is located in the Visitor Information Centre in Kempsey, New South Wales. This gallery is dedicated to the promotion and sales of the work of both established and emerging Aboriginal artists. The gallery is an excellent place to see the works of local Indigenous artists and is open from Tuesday to Sunday from 10am to 4pm. You can also buy Aboriginal art pieces to take home as a keepsake.

The Aboriginal art forms at the Dunghutti-Ngaku Aboriginal Arts Gallery are primarily centred on storytelling and the transmission of knowledge. These forms of art can range from ancient rock paintings to contemporary dance, body painting, and arts and crafts. The paintings of these artists are often connected to individuals through their family lineage. In addition, artists are only allowed to depict Dreaming stories and subjects that are covered by traditional Aboriginal law. This is because Aboriginal artists use symbols instead of written language to communicate cultural wisdom, spiritual values, and land management.

Macleay River Historical Museum

The Macleay River Historical Museum in Kemptsey, NSW, features exhibits from the region’s history. The museum is located at South Kempsey Park, next to the town’s Visitor Information Centre. The museum features displays on aboriginal culture, the timber industry, military history, the natural environment, textiles, and early vehicles. For more information, visit the Macleay River Historical Society’s website.

In the town, the Macleay River Historical Society operates a award-winning museum and an Aboriginal gallery. The latter features works by prominent aboriginal artists, including the Dunghutti people. In addition, the gallery also markets the work of emerging aboriginal artists. The museum is well-suited for families with children, and older members of the community are sure to appreciate its extensive collections.

Wigay Aboriginal Cultural Park

Wigay is an Aboriginal word meaning bush tucker. It is a place where visitors can experience local Aboriginal culture and learn how to make traditional foods from the native plants. The Wigay Aboriginal Cultural Park is a UNESCO World Heritage site that was established 18 years ago and has recently been handed back to the local council. You can also visit the Kempsey Town Scenic Drive, which includes heritage buildings and features a didgeridoo.

The Wigay Aboriginal Cultural Park in Kemps, NSW, is located on the Worimi Conservation Lands, which were important to the local Aboriginals. The land served as an important spiritual place, and today it provides direct access to the ocean. There are also many beautiful, historic structures that are worth checking out. A few other places to explore in the area include the Wigay Aboriginal Cultural Park and the Kempsey Golf Club.

Rudder Park Historical Lookout

To get a great view of the Macleay River and the town of Kempsey, you should head to the Rudder Park Historical Lookout. Located on a hill overlooking the Macleay River, the lookout provides fantastic views of the town. The lookout is accessible via a directional marker. You can also take a picnic and stretch your legs.

The Macleay River runs through Kempsey Shire, which is home to a variety of natural attractions and interesting exhibits. You can see stone spear heads and other cultural relics from Aboriginal times. A model dairy industry and timber mill are also on display. If you are interested in rural life, you can also tour a heritage cottage. The museum is well-signed and includes local chitchat.

If you are an avid walker, you should consider taking a walk in the park. There are plenty of picnic tables and toilets located within the park. The lookout, which faces west, is a good place to watch sunset. A 2.75 hectare park, Rudder Park also features Aboriginal plant species. You can take a picnic and spend some time admiring the views. Once you’ve experienced the views, you can explore the town and its natural surroundings.

Bucket Brewery

For something different to do in Kempsey, head to the Bucket Brewery. Located at 2 Prince Street, South Kempsey, this family-owned and operated brewery produces 100% of its own beer. The tour of the brewery will give you an overview of the entire process, from hops to beer, and includes a tasting of some of the brews.

Visit Bucket Brewery, a family-run craft brewer. The brewery is located in Kempsey, NSW. Here, you can taste a range of quality beers, each handcrafted and crafted on site. Try out the various beer styles available at their taps and become a part of the Bucket family! It’s definitely worth a visit!

The Bucket Brewery is open Monday to Friday and Saturdays. They have a variety of beers available, and you can purchase the ones you like at a nearby liquor store. For your convenience, they also have taproom hours and stock their products at Ritchies SUPA IGA Plus Liquor. The Bucket Brewery is just one of the many things to do in Kempsey, NSW.

David Cronk - Editor

David Cronk is the editor of online travel magazine Travelodium Travel Magazine. David has travelled to over 30 countries of the world and his writing has been published by enRoute magazine - Air Canada's inflight magazine and by Hotel & Accommodation Management Magazine. David has worked as a Sales Executive for Sheraton and Hilton Hotels and for Hotelbookers in London. He has worked also as a Hotel Night Manager and in bars throughout Europe. David eventually settled into a position working as a croupier for several years before changing careers to become a Data, Sales and Statistical Analyst.

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