Things to do in Torquay – Vic – Australia


If you’re looking for fun things to do in Torquay, you’ve come to the right place. This seaside town lies at the eastern end of the Great Ocean Road, southwest of Melbourne. Torquay is known for its surfing beaches, and there are many ways to experience the surf lifestyle in this coastal city. Start by hiking the Surf Coast Walk, which begins at Point Impossible Beach and heads southwest past the Point Danger Marine Sanctuary. The trail winds past a limestone reef and sea slugs. Don’t forget to check out the Australian National Surfing Museum, which showcases surf memorabilia and exhibits.

The Great Ocean Road

The Great Ocean Road in Torquay, Victoria is a famous tourist destination. The 243km road, carved by returned soldiers during the Depression, winds its way along the coastline, taking in the stunning vistas of the sea. The road is the world’s longest war memorial and a popular tourist attraction, providing stunning views of the coastline and a chance to visit some of Australia’s most picturesque towns.

Whether you’re looking for stunning scenery or breathtaking views, the Twelve Apostles are worth a visit. The spectacular rock formations are shaped by erosion, making them harder at the top and softer at the base. The Great Southern Ocean is responsible for the erosion process, and it carries its weight across the cliffs and creates new stacks and overhangs along the way. You’ll never forget your visit to this iconic attraction!

Taking a drive along the Great Ocean Road is a wonderful way to spend an afternoon, and it is an adventure. This famous stretch of road is the perfect destination for those who enjoy wine, food, and nature. From Torquay, you can drive the entire road in one day or stay overnight and explore some of the other towns. This road is an ideal way to see more of the Victoria region, so take your time to explore it and get the most out of it.

Bells Beach

Bells Beach is a coastal locality in Victoria, Australia. The area is known for its surfing activities. It is approximately 100 km south-west of Melbourne and is located near the towns of Torquay and Jan Juc. The locality is a popular tourist destination for its surfing. In addition to surfing, Bells Beach offers a variety of activities. Whether you are looking to spend a relaxing day on the beach, or want to catch some waves, Bells Beach will satisfy your desires.

Bells Beach is a popular surf destination, and is home to Australia’s famous Rip Curl clothing company. It is also home to many surf competitions and offers beautiful views from its rocky reefs. Whether you are a novice or a seasoned surfer, there is a wave to suit you. Whether you’re new to the sport or want to improve your skills, Bells Beach offers waves for all skill levels.

Point Danger Lookout

If you’ve never been to the town of Torquay, you need to see this landmark. From this lookout, you can enjoy the beautiful view of the beaches and the Bass Strait. To the south, Bass Strait is wild while to the north, it’s protected. In 1891, a clipper ship wrecked at this site, making it a popular snorkeling spot.

If you’re a fan of nature, you can also spend the day exploring the town’s front beach. The sandy sand is ideal for swimming, and the front beach is accessible by foot. However, if you’re an experienced surfer, you’ll probably want to head south to Jan Juc Beach. This beach has strong rips and high waves, but it has toilets and plenty of public access.

Aside from being a great viewpoint, Point Danger is also home to a memorial honoring Captain Cook, who discovered the east coast of Australia 200 years ago. Another important site here is the Centaur Remembrance Walk, which commemorates the ships lost in World War II. The memorial features information boards to learn about the history of the area and its significance. Visitors can extend their walk further by visiting Snapper Rocks, Rainbow Bay, and Coolangatta Beach.

Australian National Surfing Museum

The Australian National Surfing Museum in Torquay, Victoria is widely regarded as the world’s largest beach culture and surfing museum. It is also considered the most important centre of surfing heritage in the world. Visitors to the museum will experience an ambiance of surf culture that will be difficult to forget. Its collection of more than three million objects represents the history and culture of surfing and beach culture. A trip to Torquay is not complete without visiting the Australian National Surfing Museum.

The Australian National Surfing Museum in Torquay features vintage surf memorabilia and an epic collection of surfboards. You’ll also get to experience surf culture in the country’s surfing heritage and see a VW kombi van, the ultimate surfmobile. The museum has many other attractions, such as a café and a winery. If you are a history buff, you’ll find the museum’s museum shop filled with surf memorabilia and historic images.

Point Impossible Surf Beach

For a true nudist experience, make sure you head to the clothing-optional Point Impossible Surf Beach in Torquay, Victoria. This beach is designated as a legal nudist beach under the Nudity Act 1983. Despite its name, many people still find it intimidating to visit. To avoid getting caught in the beach’s nippiness, you should make your reservation in advance.

The water temperature at Point Impossible is a consistent 13.8 degC, which should make it comfortable to wear a wetsuit. However, you should still consider wearing gloves and boots, as the windchill factor is a bit higher than the water temperature. Here are the current wind and surf conditions for Point Impossible:

Torquay Central Farmers Market

Every Saturday from 8.30am to 1pm, the Torquay Central Farmers Market is a great place to find fresh produce from local businesses. There are a variety of local produce stands selling cheese, eggs, bread, jams, olive oil, honey, and more. Visitors can also try some locally roasted coffee. Visitors should plan ahead and bring some money to spend. Be sure to check out the website for updates on events and schedules.

Located in the Surf Coast Shire office carpark, the Torquay Farmers Market celebrates fresh, local produce. Also on Saturdays, take the time to visit the Torquay Central Farmers Market for local art and handmade products. You can also sample artisan goods and purchase a souvenir to take home. Located less than 40 minutes’ walk from the town center, the market is a popular place for shoppers to visit.

If you’re looking for something more relaxing, consider visiting the Bellbrae Estate, located just outside of town. This vineyard is the only one on the Great Ocean Road and is located in the Bellbrae Reserve. Its wines are elegant, contemporary and made with local fruit. You can even try some wine and sample local cheeses while you’re there! You can find a great wine selection at Bellbrae Estate.

Surfcoastimages Gallery

There are a few things to do in Torquay, Victoria, a small township located about 90 minutes south of Melbourne. The town is known as the surfing capital of Australia and is considered the official start of the Great Ocean Road, an extensive road that hugs the south coast of Australia. Along the road, there are landmarks and national parks. Visit the War Memorial and the World War I Soldiers’ Memorial, both of which feature World War I military photographs.

The Surfcoastimages Gallery, opened in 2021, is an art gallery that features the work of local artists. The gallery also features international landscapes and art by Kevan Way, a professional photographer who has worked in Melbourne for 30 years. Visitors can also participate in art classes and view works of art by local artists. If you like a particular piece of artwork, consider contacting the gallery to make arrangements for personal delivery.

David Cronk - Editor

David Cronk is the editor of online travel magazine Travelodium Travel Magazine. David has travelled to over 30 countries of the world and his writing has been published by enRoute magazine - Air Canada's inflight magazine and by Hotel & Accommodation Management Magazine. David has worked as a Sales Executive for Sheraton and Hilton Hotels and for Hotelbookers in London. He has worked also as a Hotel Night Manager and in bars throughout Europe. David eventually settled into a position working as a croupier for several years before changing careers to become a Data, Sales and Statistical Analyst.

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