Things to do in Young – NSW – Australia


There are many things to do in Young, New South Wales, including visiting the famous Hilltops Region. Young’s Chinese Tribute Garden, Ballinaclash Orchard and Cellar Door, Grove Estate, and the Hilltops Folk Museum are some of the most popular tourist attractions in the area. If you’re visiting the area, consider doing a little research before you plan your visit. We’ve listed a few ideas for you below.

Lambing Flat Chinese Tribute Garden

The Lambing Flat Chinese Tribute Garden is located near the Chinaman’s Dam reserve. This place was opened in 1992 and was meant to honour the contributions made by Chinese gold miners to the settlement of Young, Australia. It’s a peaceful, picturesque setting and offers picnic and barbecue facilities. Visitors can also relax on the garden’s viewing platform. After visiting the Chinese Tribute Garden, you can enjoy a relaxing picnic lunch and soak up the atmosphere of this historic garden.

Ballinaclash Orchard and Cellar Door

The Ballinaclash Orchard and Cellard Door in Young, New South Wales, is a pick-your-own orchard and winery. Originally a cherry and stone fruit orchard, the company began planting grape vines in 1997. Since then, it has developed a reputation for producing high-quality single vineyard wines. Its vineyards have won several major wine awards.

Visit the Ballinaclash Orchard and Cellard Door to taste and purchase local wines and other products. The Ballinaclash shed shop sells sun-ripened stone fruit and jams. Try the Cherry Ice-Cream. If you’re on a budget, you can even bring your own picnic basket! You’ll love it! The best part? The grapes are free.

Lambing Flat Folk Museum

The Lambing Flat Folk Museum in Young is located in the historic town of Young. The museum is run by the Young Historical Society and aims to promote tourism in the town by sharing the history of the area. The museum acknowledges the Wiradjuri nation and the land of the Burrowmunditroy clan. It was established in 1905 by two pioneering men who were passionate about sharing their stories and experiences. The museum also provides information about the people and culture of the Wiradjuri and Aboriginal people.

The museum is in the former Young Public School building, which was built in 1883. The museum displays artifacts from the town’s history and is open four days a week. The museum’s permanent collection includes items from the gold rush era, the early years of the United States, World War One, and the hairdressing industry.

Grove Estate

Visitors to Locust Grove Estate will appreciate its Italianate villa, built in 1851 for Samuel F. B. Morse. Miles of carriage roads are woven throughout the 180-acre estate. The estate is surrounded by historic gardens and provides breathtaking views of the Hudson River. The Young family preserved the estate as a museum, displaying its art and history in the estate’s 25 rooms. Visitors are encouraged to take a tour or taste one of the estate’s wines.

Wine lovers will love the distinctive character of the wines produced at Grove Estate. The estate’s vineyards cover a total of 100 acres. They started planting Zinfandel in 1996 and soon added a standout variety from Italy – Nebbiolo. Today, the winery continues to make and award its own award-winning varietals. And while most wineries produce great wines that are worthy of awards, Grove Estate’s Italian varietals have earned the attention of international wine enthusiasts.

Bluestill Distillery

When visiting the region of Young, NSW, a visit to Bluestill Distillery is a must. Not only is the distillery located on the beautiful Fontenoy Street, but there’s also a cafe, function centre, and art gallery. Located on the corner of Henry Lawson Way and Fontenoy Street, you’ll be able to enjoy delicious house-made spirits while dining on country-style cuisine. There is plenty of room to park your car and tour a distillery.

There are a number of things to do in Young, including visiting the Lambing Flat Folk Museum, a small museum with a rich history of the region. The museum covers topics from the early gold rush to the Anti-Chinese riots. You can even purchase a book or DVD about the history of the town and Ben Hall. The museum is also a great place to grab a coffee and take a break while you’re visiting the distillery.

The Big Cherries

The Big Cherries are a group of six enormous cherry sculptures located in the town of Young, New South Wales, Australia. They were originally located on Short Street, but later moved with the tourist information centre to Lovell Street, across from the old railway station. The town is marketed as the Cherry Capital of Australia and hosts the annual National Cherry Festival. Located along the Olympic Highway, Young is about two hours from Canberra. Located in the rolling hills of the Blue Mountains, Young is considered to be Australia’s cherry capital.

The Big Cherries are part of a series of tourism attractions located along major highways in the region. The sculptures are also tourist traps, but the Big Cherries are an enduring tradition that attracts a wide range of people. You can find them in parks, on public roads, and between famous travel destinations. You can also visit a working cherry farm and take a lesson on how to pick them. The Big Cherries are a must-see, so be sure to bring a tripod.

Chalkers Crossing Vineyard and Olive Grove

If you’re planning a getaway to Australia, make sure to visit Chalkers Crossing Vineyard and Olive Grove in the city of Young. This vineyard is located at 387 Henry Lawson Way, Young, NSW 2594. There’s a beautiful vineyard setting, and you can enjoy a taste of the local produce. The restaurant features a menu inspired by the region’s fresh produce. While there, you can also taste some of the region’s best wines.

There are two award-winning wineries in Young: Chalkers Crossing Vineyard and Olive Grove. This modern winery focuses on premium cool climate wines. Winemaker Celine Rousseau has trained in Bordeaux and studied in France. She gained experience at top wineries in Bordeaux, St Emilion, and Languedoc. She has also worked in the Margaret River and the Perth Hills region of Western Australia.

Sunnyside Rose Garden

When you visit Sunnyside Gardens, you can also learn more about the people who built it. A renowned advocate of human scale communities, Lewis Mumford was instrumental in the development of Sunnyside Gardens. A photograph of Mumford from 1926 is available below, and you can view the photo of him on the site’s webpage. Felix Adler, a long-time elder on the City Housing Board and a founder of the Ethical Culture Society, also helped establish the Sunnyside Gardens. Other influential people in the development of the Sunnyside Gardens include Clarence Stein, Alexander Bing, and other notable figures.

David Cronk - Editor

David Cronk is the editor of online travel magazine Travelodium Travel Magazine. David has travelled to over 30 countries of the world and his writing has been published by enRoute magazine - Air Canada's inflight magazine and by Hotel & Accommodation Management Magazine. David has worked as a Sales Executive for Sheraton and Hilton Hotels and for Hotelbookers in London. He has worked also as a Hotel Night Manager and in bars throughout Europe. David eventually settled into a position working as a croupier for several years before changing careers to become a Data, Sales and Statistical Analyst.

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